Code: 81999657 (5226577) | Date: 12/03/2016 | Time: 11:17|
Print Version | Send To Friend

Australian envoy: Iran re-opening for business

Kuala Lumpur, March 12, IRNA- Australian Ambassador to Iran, Paul Foley said that removal of sanctions will reduce barriers on exports and imports to Iran and improve Australian business access to Iranian markets.

Trade with the second-largest country in the Middle East, with a population of 78 million people, is back on the agenda after the lifting of a range of sanctions, according to Australian Government Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade web site.

Sectors identified for good early prospects for Australian exporters include agriculture and food; water sustainability and management; education and skills training; and the health care and well-being sectors.

In the medium term there are also likely to be opportunities for Australian companies in mining and oil and gas-related areas.

Twenty years ago, Iran was Australia's biggest export destination in the Middle East with the export of agriculture products dominating, along with post-graduate education and mining, oil and gas services.

Foreign Minister Julie Bishop announced in January that Australia was lifting autonomous economic sanctions on Iran, such as those targeting the oil and gas sector, most banks and the transport sector.

Also many Iranian individuals and entities that were designated under autonomous sanctions have been removed from the Australian Consolidated List, which means that Australian business can undertake business activities with these previously specified individuals and entities.

While market conditions have changed significantly, a growing middle class - including Greater Tehran, with a population of around 15 million and large cities including Mashad, Esfehan and Tabriz are demanding higher quality goods and services.

Despite recent international sanctions Iran has maintained a large and sophisticated market with its young and well-educated population, a resilient private sector and a diverse economic base.

These factors combined with its strategic geographic location have Iran poised to re-engage with the international business community.

Since 2006, Australia had implemented successive rounds of UN Security Council sanctions against Iran for its nuclear program, and since 2008 had also implemented autonomous sanctions.

Foreign Minister Julie Bishop announced in January that Australia was lifting autonomous economic sanctions on Iran, such as those targeting the oil and gas sector, most banks and the transport sector.

While market conditions have changed significantly, a growing middle class - including Greater Tehran, with a population of around 15 million and large cities including Mashad, Esfehan and Tabriz - are demanding higher quality goods and services.


9376**1312


 
  • Latest News
  • Press